‘Know It, Control It for Seniors’ classes to meet Oct. 30-Dec. 18

 

The Jackson County Senior Center of the Department on Aging is offering Know It, Control It for Seniors, a new high blood pressure management program for senior adults

Created by the Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch of the N.C. Division of Public Health, the program is a community-based blood pressure management program. It is designed to help participants self-monitor their blood pressure and make healthy lifestyle changes to control high blood pressure. Trained blood pressure coaches teach this program using evidence-based strategies.

Almost one out of every three adults in the United States (29 percent or about 75 million people) has been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Among adults 65 years and older, two out of three have high blood pressure and half of them do not have it under control. All adults should consult with a health care provider, learn their blood pressure numbers, learn to self-monitor their blood pressure and take steps to get healthy.

Know It, Control It for Seniors classes are open to people who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, are over age 50, have an irregular heartbeat and have not had a heart attack or stroke in the past six months. During each class, the blood pressure coach will lead a discussion on a healthy habit that will help participants control their blood pressure.

On class days, the blood pressure coach will also assist each participant with measuring and logging his/her blood pressure with the goal of having them become proficient at tracking and measuring their blood pressure on their own.

The class meets from 1-3 p.m. weekly on Wednesdays, Oct. 30-Dec. 18, in the board room of the Jackson County Department on Aging.

Learn more about the Know It, Control It high blood pressure management program by contacting Laura Rodi, Health and Wellness manager at the Jackson County Senior Center at 631-8033. To sign up for this program, call 586-5494.

This program is supported by a grant from the Great Smokies Health Foundation.